Two prominent ex-executives sexually harassed staffers at Christianity Today

On Tuesday, Christianity Today Magazine stated that former editor-in-chief Mark Galli and former advertising director Olatokunbo Olawoye committed “unchecked” sexual harassment of employees over a dozen years. Galli made headlines in 2020 by attacking then-president Donald Trump.

No action was taken as women reported two top leaders’ inappropriate behavior for more than 12 years.

Galli, the magazine’s editor-in-chief for seven years until retiring in January 2020, was accused of many episodes of “demeaning, inappropriate, and disrespectful behavior.” CT News Editor Daniel Silliman posted in a Tuesday web story.

Mr. Galli, a three-decade veteran of the Christian publisher who has held many editorial roles, wrote a widely circulated editorial in December 2019 criticizing then-President Trump as unfit for duty.

Mark’s 2019 editorial wrote, “Whether Mr. Trump should be ousted from office by the Senate or by popular vote next election – that is a matter of prudential judgment.” “We feel that removing him is a matter of respect to the Creator of the Ten Commandments, not partisan sympathies.”

Mr. Galli was accused of “touching them inappropriately” by eight women, but according to the magazine, no action was taken until three separate allegations of inappropriate touching by Mr. Galli over three days in August 2019.

Mr. Trump’s “stacked deck of extreme immorality and ethical incompetence” would “crash down on the reputation of evangelical religion and the world’s understanding of the gospel,” according to the editor. Mr. Galli admitted his failures to the magazine he used to run as editor.

Olatokunbo Olawoye, the publication’s former advertising director, was accused of exerting himself on female staffers. According to the CT piece, Olawoye, who was sentenced to three years in jail in 2017 after pleading guilty to flying to meet a juvenile for sex, “did not respect personal boundaries” when it came to female colleagues at the firm.

“Olawoye routinely invited himself into women’s offices, shut the door, and engaged them in long, personal chats,” according to the story.

Olawoye’s “inordinate” engagement with a female college student interning at the firm was reported by another manager at the Carol Stream, Illinois, publisher, who claimed the advertising director asked the young woman “inappropriate questions,” including whether she would like to have dinner at his house.